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Onion Expert

Why are there so few Mediums and so many Colossals?

Shay Myers - Sunday, December 11, 2016

For those of you on the buying desk, I imagine at least a few have you have wondered the reason behind the large amounts of Colossal and larger onions this year. There are, as you might expect, a few reasons for this.


I should explain what we do to create our desired size profile in the field. It's pretty simple; we plant onions closer together or farther apart depending on the size of onions we want to grow. The closer together the onions, the smaller. The farther apart, the larger. You can think of it like a litter of puppies all fighting to get something to eat, if there are more dogs than there is food, you end up with overall smaller pups and and a runt here and there. If the litter is small, you end up with a few really fat puppies. Onions are no different. They are competing for the nutrients from the soil, just like the puppies do for milk.





This crop wasn't planted farther apart though, it was Mother Nature who came in and created all that space. Wet, windy, and cold weather early in the onion's lives killed about 10% more than what most of us planned for. These dead onions made more space. Normally more space would mean larger onions, but mother nature followed up the wet, windy, and cold weather with almost perfect growing conditions for the remainder of the season. So not only did our onions have more nutrients available to them in the soil, but they also had warm days and especially warm nights that kept them growing. The end result, yields that were 10-15 higher than normal with stand counts that were about that much lower than normal. Mother Nature is Awesome!

Christmas Trees and Freight Adjustments

Ashley Narvaiz - Wednesday, December 09, 2015

25-30 million Christmas trees are sold in the United States every year! A product that costs very little to grow, makes for a great profit during the holiday season. Oregon is listed as one of the top Christmas Tree producing states in the nation. What you may not know is that these farm-grown festivities bring competition for freight. 



With the weather cooling down, we can't ship our onions on flat bed trucks during the winter months, which limits our options for transportation. From a week before Thanksgiving to Christmas Day, Christmas tree shippers are feverishly shipping trees from coast to coast. With such a large profit return, tree shippers are willing to pay more for freight costs, simply because they can afford to. They have a month-long time crunch to make profit. 


This leaves shippers like us having a harder time not only finding trucks but also paying the freight costs. Typically we see a 15-20% increase in delivery rates, especially to the east coast. 


During this season, freight has been great up to this point. While the holiday prices are better than they were last year, the rush of Christmas trees has still affected our loads. 

Late Season Onion Care Instructions

Blake Branen Rosencrantz - Wednesday, March 04, 2015

Over the last 5-8 years we have dramatically improved our ability to extend the storage-onion shipping season.  The combination of hearty storage varieties, cold storages, and sprout inhibitors means that many we can now supply onions from right here in Oregon for 10 months of the year.  However, with the advantage these better skinned varieties come with there are also a few characteristics that must be managed in order to minimize shrink and maximize profits.

Later in the season you may begin to see green specks in the center of the onions.  This little green speck is what we call an internal sprout.  This happens naturally as the onion goes through its life cycle and this is a very manageable issue.  If an onion is kept cool it will take, at least, several weeks for the internal sprouts to become external ones.

Here are a few pointers:

  1. Keep onions cool (35-45 degrees) (While these temps may cause a bit of translucency, don’t worry it will go away with just 12-24 hours at 45 or higher)

  2. Keep onions well ventilated, the more air the better (Our storages run 34-36 degrees and have constant air flow.)
  3. Keep onions dry (Our storages run 55-65% humidity.)

  4. If you have to choose between dry and warm or humid and cool….choose humid and cool

  5. Avoid sudden changes in temp as the papery skin will draw-in and hold moisture

  6. No room in the cooler, try air stacking the bags to allow air to reach the center of the pallet

  7. Plan on keeping onions for 3 weeks during the later part of the storage season… treat them a bit more like you might an apple.

Quick Onion Market Update

Shay Myers - Thursday, November 20, 2014

While there are reports of sluggish sales on onions nationwide, the numbers seem to indicate that not to be the case. That is to say the emotional response doesn’t match how we all feel. We feel like it is slow because we all have onions to sell and that is reflected in the prices we are willing to offer to move onions, at least yellow ones. Jumbo yellow onions are trading for $5.00-5.50 and mediums for about a dollar less than that. Jumbo and medium reds are holding their own and are trading for $6.50 and $5.00, respectively. Jumbo Whites are $12 and Mediums are $10.

 

Owyhee Produce Adopts Early Tracking Technology-Signs Exclusive Deal with Locus Traxx Worldwide

Shay Myers - Friday, November 14, 2014

Traditional farming has changed drastically in the past century, in more ways than one. Machines and technology especially, have digitized and optimized farming practices for modern-day growers – and the evolution continues.

 

Tracking technology has been incredibly popular in the last few decades – generically being used to monitor mailed packages, coordinate road-trips with GPS systems, and tagging your personal location via Facebook. 

 

Shay Myers, General Manager at Owyhee Produce, has wanted to pair tracking technology and produce for years, but the technology hasn’t quite been where it needed to be. The process was rough, inconvenient, and too expensive to bother implementing – that is, until now. New, disposable, easy to use technology has been released by Locus Traxx and Owyhee Produce is on board as an early adopter.  During PMA Fresh summit in October, Owyhee’s Shay Myers penned an agreement for exclusivity on onions for the new SmartTraxx GO™ technology with David Benjamin, CEO of Locus Traxx Worldwide.


 

This new technology provides Owyhee Produce and its customers with a disposable tracker placed among the load. The tracker is activated upon release of the shipment and monitors the location and temperature of the load in real-time. 

 

“It takes out the guess work,” Myers said. “That’s really what it comes down to. The

SmartTraxx GO™ eliminates the breakdown of communication between the product receiver and the truck carrier. It’s all about preventing potential problems instead of having to react to them.  When we buy a 10 dollar widget from Amazon, we expect to be able to track it from shipping to delivery, but not with a 10 thousand dollar load of produce? That seemed crazy to me.”

 

So from now on, each electronic Bill of Lading from Owyhee will come with a tracking number and link.  This link works just like when you make a purchase on online, but instead of just knowing the general location of you package you will know the specific location and the temperature of the load in real time. 

 

What are the practical benefits of this system? 

  • Temperature Control

  • Location

  • Food Safety

  • On time deliveries

  • Assured Routing

  • Damage Prevention

 

Not only does tracking benefit the produce receiver, but it also benefits the grower/shipper. 

 

 

"As a shipper I like it,” Myers said. “It’s very valuable. When a customer calls, I don’t have to guess where their shipment is, or make three phone calls, and talk to the driver, etc. I know instantaneously where the load is exactly, always.”  

 

About Locus Traxx

Locus Traxx Worldwide is the leader in real-time temperature, location, and security monitoring for perishable and high value shipments in transit. Using their Oversight system and the technological superiority and versatility of the SmartTraxxTM system, Locus Traxx Worldwide can give customers access to critical data, at any time, and from any location. For more information, visit http://www.locustraxx.com

 

About Owyhee Produce

Owyhee Produce is a hybrid-farmer/agri-entrepreuneurial family business that farms over 3700 acres in Oregon and Idaho.  The company is proud to grow food for millions of consumers throughout the entirety of North America. The company provides customers with some of the finest onions on the market. For more information, visit www.owyheeproduce.com.


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